Skip to main content

About your Search

Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
the election on tuesday, on wednesday either barack obama or mitt romney will have to start worrying about the same urgent challenge, how to stop the united states from falling over the fiscal cliff. this is, of course, the second cliff hanger that the united states has faced in two years, the first being the debt ceiling debacle. how did the world's greatest democracy start functioning so badly? maybe the next president can try to fix this broader problem. but first the fiscal cliff. unless congress acts, the spending cuts and tack increases that would be triggered automatically next january would take 5.1% out of the country's gdp in one year according to the congressional budget office. that would be one of the most severe experiments with austerity in history, larger than anything greece, spain, italy, or the united kingdom has tried. in fact, it's almost three times the size of britain's austerity program. and the results of those european programs have thus far been a dramatic slowdown in economic growth and a sharp spike in unemployment. once again, the rest of the world watches to
-election of barack obama and consider what else happened this week. three states voted to legalize same-sex marriage, which is the civil rights cause of our times. one day we will look back and wonder how people could have been so willing to deny equal treatment under the law to a small minority. and tuesday will stand as one of the most important moments marking the end of that cruelty. two other states voted to legalize recreational use of marijuana, which will mark the beginning of the end of the war on drugs. this may be the most costly and futile war the united states has ever waged. we've spent $1 trillion to fight this war without reducing availableability of drugs while also destroying our pea nal system. according to data from the oecd. about 1 president 6 million americans were arrested in 2010 on drug charges, most for using marijuana. this week's votes indicates that americans have begun rethunking these policies, perhaps moving toward ones that would deprive drug cartels of their huge profits and allow police to focus on serious crime. perhaps the most sturching shift came not in the pa
and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. today on the show, the second obama administration. how can the president and his team make sure to do it right? how can he avoid the pitfalls of so many second terms? i'll talk to two former white house chiefs of staff and david gergen, who has advised several presidents. >>> then, what happens when you mix big data and a presidential election? the results are fascinating and a little scary. it might well be the future of politics in america. >>> also, sea barriers, wetlands, futuristic construction materials. what is the answer to climate change, and how can we all adapt to this new normal of hurricanes, tornadoes, and floods? i'll talk to jeffrey sachs and "time" magazine's brian walsh. and why does the world's greatest democracy have such an antique, disorganized, irregular way of voting? i'll take a look. but first, here's my take. growing up in india in the 1960s and '70s i always thought of america as the future. it was the place where the newest technology, the best gadgets, the latest fads seemed to originate. seemingly exotic politic
, and a bit about barack obama as well. >>> then the conflict in gaza yet again reminds us forget about globalization and information revolution. if you want to understand the world, look at geography. nations are still bound by it, says robert kaplan, who uses maps to show us what to worry about. you won't want to miss this. >>> and the middle class is rising. no, not here in the united states, but right next door in latin america, and it will have huge consequences for the western hemisphere and the world. >>> also, if you thought black friday was crazy, check out the sales in europe. i'll explain. but first here's my take. >>> it's thanksgiving weekend, america. time to reflect on our good fortune. it's also a time that most americans think about the unusual origins of the united states, a land of immigrants. we see o ourselves as special in this way, and we are, except that we're not quite as exceptional as we think anymore. something fascinating has happened over the last two decades. other countries have been transforming themselves into immigrant societies, adopting many of ameri
the world's number two power. but first here's my take. now that president obama has won re-election, the debate in washington has shifted from whether we should raise taxes to how and by how much. this makes sense. with a deficit over a trillion dollars, we will need a combination of increased tax revenues and spending cuts. the president and his allies including robert rubin have made the case that eliminating deductions simply will not get you enough money. you will actually have to raise tax rates. that's probably true as well. but let's not give up entirely on the issue of deductions and all those other hidden subsidies that the simpson-bowles report accurately called backdoor spending hidden in the tax code. in order to sound like they're not spending money, congress often tends to grant special exemptions to paying taxes. in his excellent book "red ink" david russell points out if you get a $1,000 exemption, it's exactly the same as being paid a thousand dollars by the government. yet one is recorded as government spending, which is bad, the other, a tax cut, which is
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)